2017 NCWIT AWARD for Aspirations in Computing

The Governor’s School for Science and Technology Scientific Programming Students Win 2017 NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing The regional NCWIT (National Center for Women & Information Technology) Award for Aspirations in Computing honors Laurel Hunter, Hampton HS and Katie Liu, Grafton HS for their computing-related achievements and interests. Awardees are selected for their computing and IT aptitude, leadership ability, academic history, and plans for post-secondary education. Recipients receive two engraved awards: one for her, and one for her school’s trophy case. They also receive opportunities for scholarships, internships, research experiences, and other educational and employment opportunities provided by NCWIT member organizations. The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing offers both a national and local award competition to generate support and visibility for young women’s participation in computing around the country. Each local award taps into the powerful network of NCWIT Alliance members: teams from academia, non-profit organizations, startups, and corporations come together to build a community of support for young women interested in computing.

2017 Virginia & Washington DC Affiliate Competition Results
Laurel Hunter – Winner
Katie Liu – Runner-Up

Source: GSST

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2017 NCWIT AWARD for Aspirations in Computing

The Governor’s School for Science and Technology Scientific Programming Students Win 2017 NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing The regional NCWIT (National Center for Women & Information Technology) Award for Aspirations in Computing honors Laurel Hunter, Hampton HS and Katie Liu, Grafton HS for their computing-related achievements and interests. Awardees are selected for their computing and IT aptitude, leadership ability, academic history, and plans for post-secondary education. Recipients receive two engraved awards: one for her, and one for her school’s trophy case. They also receive opportunities for scholarships, internships, research experiences, and other educational and employment opportunities provided by NCWIT member organizations. The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing offers both a national and local award competition to generate support and visibility for young women’s participation in computing around the country. Each local award taps into the powerful network of NCWIT Alliance members: teams from academia, non-profit organizations, startups, and corporations come together to build a community of support for young women interested in computing.

2017 Virginia & Washington DC Affiliate Competition Results
Laurel Hunter – Winner
Katie Liu – Runner-Up

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17th Annual CNU Regional High School Mathematics Contest.  

CNU High School Math Contest is an  annual mathematics competition for high school students in southeastern Virginia. The goal of the competition is to cultivate interest in good mathematics. Over 100 students representing schools from central and eastern   Virginia came out to compete.

The Governor’s School for Science and Technology was represented by two teams comprising of students from Jamestown HS &  Lafayette HS, in Williamsburg, James City, Grafton HS, & Tabb HS in York, Kecoughtan HS, in Hampton and Menchville HS, in Newport News. They won for 2nd overall team score, with individual prizes going to:  Ben Keener for top school score outside overall winners, Stephen Shamaiengar for top score, all independent schools, and Stanislav Kuzmenko for 2nd highest score, overall.

 

 

Source: GSST

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Student Conference of the National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in STEM

Six students from the Governor’s School for Science and Technology attended the Student Conference of the     National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in STEM (NCSSS).  They were chaperoned by Dr. Mary Patterson.  The conference was jointly  hosted by the Bergen County Academies, Hackensack, NJ and the Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ.

The conference included tours of the extensive laboratories of both host institutions, as well as various sites of New York City, with emphasis on innovative technology,     including virtual technology.

 

Source: GSST

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Holy Cow!

Holy Cow! They Fly!

 

The engineers in the Junior Engineering Physics Class have encountered an unusual creature, the Flying Chick fil-A Cows.  These are normal Chick fil-A Cows that have had so much freedom that they have mutated into a flying variety. The interest in this new variety of cows is obviously very high.  NASA needs to determine the tensile strength required for flying cow leashes.  These leashes will allow the cows the freedom to fly in a circular fashion and yet keep them safe from harm.  NASA has asked the Junior Physics class at GSST to help with this investigation.  The class has received a grant to study these cows.  The grant requires hard data and a solid discussion of the physics involved.  Some of the values that NASA requires include the radial velocity and acceleration, the forces on the cow and the leash.  They will use what they have learned recently regarding uniform circular motion, Newton’s Second Law, and conical pendulums to further their investigation.  All of the work will be presented in a lab notebook with a final report to NASA.   Models for these cows were procured and studied. The results from the study of these models were compiled and sent on to the scientists at NASA to develop real leashes for the Flying Chick fil-A Cows.   The class had a lot of fun as they used their knowledge of the physics of centripetal motion and Newton’s Laws.  For more information on the results of the study and these phenomenal creatures please send a request to:

Dr. Rhett Woo

Project Manager – NASA Flying Cows Research Group

Lab Facility A70

GSST Junior Physics Class

520 Butler Farm Road

Hampton, VA 23666

 

 

Source: GSST

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17th Annual CNU Regional High School Mathematics Contest.  

CNU High School Math Contest is an  annual mathematics competition for high school students in southeastern Virginia. The goal of the competition is to cultivate interest in good mathematics. Over 100 students representing schools from central and eastern   Virginia came out to compete.

The Governor’s School for Science and Technology was represented by two teams comprising of students from Jamestown HS &  Lafayette HS, in Williamsburg, James City, Grafton HS, & Tabb HS in York, Kecoughtan HS, in Hampton and Menchville HS, in Newport News. They won for 2nd overall team score, with individual prizes going to:  Ben Keener for top school score outside overall winners, Stephen Shamaiengar for top score, all independent schools, and Stanislav Kuzmenko for 2nd highest score, overall.

 

 

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Student Conference of the National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in STEM

Six students from the Governor’s School for Science and Technology attended the Student Conference of the     National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in STEM (NCSSS).  They were chaperoned by Dr. Mary Patterson.  The conference was jointly  hosted by the Bergen County Academies, Hackensack, NJ and the Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ.

The conference included tours of the extensive laboratories of both host institutions, as well as various sites of New York City, with emphasis on innovative technology,     including virtual technology.

 

Share this post on:

Holy Cow!

Holy Cow! They Fly!

 

The engineers in the Junior Engineering Physics Class have encountered an unusual creature, the Flying Chick fil-A Cows.  These are normal Chick fil-A Cows that have had so much freedom that they have mutated into a flying variety. The interest in this new variety of cows is obviously very high.  NASA needs to determine the tensile strength required for flying cow leashes.  These leashes will allow the cows the freedom to fly in a circular fashion and yet keep them safe from harm.  NASA has asked the Junior Physics class at GSST to help with this investigation.  The class has received a grant to study these cows.  The grant requires hard data and a solid discussion of the physics involved.  Some of the values that NASA requires include the radial velocity and acceleration, the forces on the cow and the leash.  They will use what they have learned recently regarding uniform circular motion, Newton’s Second Law, and conical pendulums to further their investigation.  All of the work will be presented in a lab notebook with a final report to NASA.   Models for these cows were procured and studied. The results from the study of these models were compiled and sent on to the scientists at NASA to develop real leashes for the Flying Chick fil-A Cows.   The class had a lot of fun as they used their knowledge of the physics of centripetal motion and Newton’s Laws.  For more information on the results of the study and these phenomenal creatures please send a request to:

Dr. Rhett Woo

Project Manager – NASA Flying Cows Research Group

Lab Facility A70

GSST Junior Physics Class

520 Butler Farm Road

Hampton, VA 23666

 

 

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